It doesn’t have to

It's a classic scenario - you've got important plans you made weeks ago, when a client wants a last-minute showing. 

You: 

a) Cancel all your plans immediately and book the showing. This could be it!
b) Tell them you'll book something for next week, and risk losing the sale. 
c) Wait... there's another option?

You’re not alone if you find it tough to navigate your personal and work life balance. There are thousands of articles out there on how cell phones, social media, and competitive job markets have led to a lifestyle of always working. But trust me - creating some personal time doesn’t mean you have to risk losing your sales, and it’s critical when you run your own business. 

Figure out how you like to work. If you’re a person that loves the thrill and excitement of closing that sale no matter what - at the risk of always being available to your clients - that's great. However, that work style may not work for everyone, and may not be sustainable in the long run. If you prefer having set hours that you respond to messages and clients, that's great too. You might find it easier to manage your personal life, but there could be implications from a client perspective as well. A lot of it will come from managing expectations and the communication you have with your clients. Be true to you: if you know you’re the kind of person that needs alone time - having a working model of "always on call" might not be for you.

In the long run, experts say time off to recharge is critical to your long term success. And as hard as it is, when you’re self-employed and feel like you should always be connected, remember: it’s okay to take some personal time.

We've already talked about what your time is worth, and how to calculate what your task rate should be. But what about the things that seem like a waste of time, but end up being really important?

What you do during your workday typically  falls into three categories:

  1. Things that are a good use of your time;
  2. Things that aren’t;
  3. And things that you know aren’t a good use of your time, but you do them anyway (and maybe that’s okay)

But how do you determine what’s a good use of your time, and what activities that seem trivial, but might pay off in the long run?

Turns out, there’s one simple question to ask yourself that should give you the answer - and here it is:

What’s the potential outcome of this?

In order to be a good use of your time, or valuable in some sense, it should fall into one of four categories:

If your task isn’t hitting at least one of those points, your answer should be clear: delegate it, forget it, or change it.

Here’s an example:

You’ve got three things on your plate this morning: renewing your driver’s license so you can drive your clients to showings, learning WordPress so you can update your website, and practicing a client listing presentation. What’s the best way to spend your time?

Let’s break it down. 

Looking at the results, while the driver’s license renewal may be more urgent, overall, practicing your client presentation is the best use of your time. For more info on determining how best to spend your time, let’s book a call and navigate together.

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Copyright 2021 Jen Dumitrescu Consulting
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